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OverView: Stereopony Music, Vol. 7

Unbounded, Unrestrained

Stereopony’s fifth single – Tsukiakari no Michishirube – hit the stores on November fourth, 2009, almost a whole year since their debut. Looking back, it is hard not to be amazed at how much they accomplished in just a year of being in the music industry. Releasing five singles, a full album, and one live DVD in just one year is an impressive feat. Moreover, “Tsukiakari no Michishirube” marks Stepo’s third anime tie-in, this time as the second opening of “Darker Than Black: Ryuusei no Gemini”. AIMI takes credit for all the songs minus “Daidai Iro” lyrics, which goes to SHIHO, making it her second time contributing as a writer.

Tracklist

01. Tsukiakari no Michishirube
02. Daidai Iro
03. fuzz
04. Tsukiakari no Michishirube ~Instrumental~

Tsukiakari’s leading track of the same name is a powerful song in every sense. From AIMI’s vocal performance to NOHANA’s bass presence, everything comes together in order to make it for a great listening experience. No wonder “Tsukiakari” is also one of Stepo’s most popular songs. I especially like the way it starts, with AIMI’s guitar riffs being progressively joined by NOHANA, and then SHIHO. Lyrics-wise, it is a great song meant for encouragement. It talks about feeling lost or like life has no purpose sometimes, as we question everything we do and everyone we meet. In the end, it sends a message that the answer to all our questions lie inside ourselves, urging us to keep believing and keep moving ahead. It starts out the single with a positive message, even if musically this is more of a “serious” song.

Such is the opposite of what happens with “Daidai Iro”. Being SHIHO’s second time writing the lyrics, this is one that feels musically light. Apparently, writing thoughtful lyrics is her trademark, as this one, much like “Nagareboshi”, also flows around questions that are not meant to be answered in the song. I came to love that about SHIHO’s writing. This is a very pleasant song musically, so AIMI’s vocals only add to the experience. Finally, the lyrics picture someone reminiscing about happy times and loved ones, while walking back home late afternoon. The moment the sun sets down, metaphorically represents every happy memory that person has with people that they no longer see daily, due to that someone living in another city now. And even though they feel used to this new city, chasing their dreams, they can’t help but miss those left behind from time to time. Beautiful lyrics make for a beautiful song, all in all.

“fuzz” comes last in the tracklist, and goes just as fast because it is such a short song. Actually, this is Stepo’s second shortest song – counting 2:13 minutes – the first being “effective line”. Musically, it is fast paced and energetic; both extended intro and solo in the middle making for a great listening experience, and an even greater performance watching (on Stereopony’s last DVD). AIMI’s vocal sounds different and I’m not sure if it is the effects used or if her voice was a little hoarse at the time of the recording, but it worked really well with the overall tone of the song. The lyrics talk about the rebellious feeling of going against so called “fate”, if you were brought to think it exists. Keeping up appearances costs us too much of ourselves, so we got to free ourselves and believe in a better tomorrow, that’s the message “fuzz” sends.

Ending on a high note with “fuzz”, makes Tsukiakari no Michishirube out to be a great single, following Smilife’s previously excellent performance. It is well balanced and greatly produced, traits that seem to be the norm since A Hydrangea Blooms, and ones I welcome with open arms if they are here to stay.

Unbounded, Unrestrained Stereopony’s fifth single – Tsukiakari no Michishirube – hit the stores on November fourth, 2009, almost a whole year since their debut. Looking back, it is hard not to be amazed at how much they accomplished in just a year of being in the music industry. Releasing five singles, a full album, and one live DVD in just one year is an impressive feat. Moreover, “Tsukiakari no Michishirube” marks Stepo’s third anime tie-in, this time as the second opening of “Darker Than Black: Ryuusei no Gemini”. AIMI takes credit for all the songs minus “Daidai Iro” lyrics, which…

Review Overview

Tsukiakari no Michishirube - 96%
Daidai Iro - 95%
fuzz - 97%

96%

Aw yeah!!!

Ending on a high note with “fuzz”, makes Tsukiakari no Michishirube out to be a great single, following Smilife’s previously excellent performance.

User Rating: 5 ( 1 votes)

Break Down

Break Down

Tsukiakari no Michishirube – 96%

Music – 96/100
Lyrics – 95/100
Vocals – 96/100
Overall execution – 97/100

Daidai Iro – 95%

Music – 95/100
Lyrics – 95/100
Vocals – 95/100
Overall execution – 96/100

fuzz – 97%

Music – 98/100
Lyrics – 95/100
Vocals – 97/100
Overall execution – 98/100

About the author

wannasalad is a Very Good Days member from Brazil. Her “OverView: Stereopony Music” feature is published every Monday, starting at the beginning of September 2013 and going until the end of December 2013.
 

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